Kansas Student's Test Correction Not Really News to Fellow Classmates

Jaylen Waddle
Jaylen Waddle

I got online to check my email and a few other things when a headline caught my eye and a picture of someone I know. A fellow Junior International Baccaulaureate classmate, Geoff Stanford, had recently caught an error in this year’s Writing Kansas State Assessment. But is this really something to make such a big deal over?geoff stanford
As I glanced over comments that had been left by others, I could see that many readers agreed with me. Good for Geoff for catching this error, but a typo is not worth this much fuss. Typos occur on a daily basis and many times go unreported, because due to context clues, the typo can be ignored, or in this case, the correct word can easily be determined. I realize, playing the devil’s advocate with myself, that the word originally being “emission” got changed to “omission,” which can completely change the meaning of the sentence. But context, as I said, is key. Geoff and the reporters, I believe, mentioned that the writing prompt dealt with the Greenhouse Effect and Carbon dioxide and I’m sure most students were fully capable of realizing this was a mistake.
As all the teachers were notified across Kansas, was it really necessary to make an article over this simple mistake? As the spokeswoman for the State Department of Education, Karla Denny, said “We’re human.” and this is true. This mistake could have happened to anyone anywhere and to make such a big deal out of it is simply ridiculous in my opinion. Congratulate the boy and don’t worry about making it a big deal.

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